Retrograde filling anyone?

It’s no wonder my GP hasn’t got the letter from Dr3.  The copy arrived at my house today, but the original has been sent to a surgery near a place I lived for about 5 minutes, 5 years ago.  Helpful….

It also has jargon that I don’t understand.  It’s not surprising, I suppose, given it’s written for the GP, but it’s unusual these days.  A google search doesn’t even convince me that I’ve worked it out.  I get the bit about having a number of embolic lesions secondary to a left vertebral dissection.  I get the bit about the artery still being occluded.  But what is retrograde filling all about?  Do comment if you know. I can hazard a guess but guessing isn’t hugely wise in this case!

As a p.s. he’s written, “I will repeat the scan when I see her again in May”.  I’ve been emailing the outpatients people to ask when the scan is as, presumably I need that before I see him.  Kind of a waste of both our time to see him and then scan and then see him again, wouldn’t you have thought?  His secretary seems to think that he’ll arrange the scan after I’ve seen him.  I’m thinking I might drop him a note and mention the “new” GP address and ask about the scan timing.  I suppose I should also photocopy the letter for my actual GP, given I have no idea who “Dr South” is.

Still, at least it arrived in time for me to take it to Hospital Number 2 and Dr2 tomorrow… I know I’m supposed to tell him my case isn’t his any more and he’s not allowed to make any decisions, but I suspect he’ll have the answers.

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2 comments

  1. SteveG says:

    What I think it means is that because the vertebral artery is occluded (blocked or partially restricted), the other blood vessels before the artery are showing signs of enlargement due to the restricted blood flow ahead. The MRI/CT would show that quite easily I assume.

  2. CN says:

    Dr2, who I’ve just seen, says that it just means that blood which is coming up the right vertebral artery is, as well as flowing up into my brain, going down the artery which is occluded. You know, until it hits the dead end. I guess that’s just physics: if blood flows up it goes wherever there isn’t anything pushing it the other way!

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